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Wilt Chamberlain feared someone would poison his soda, there may be film of 100 point game

Jan 12, 2014, 6:30 PM EST

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Everything  about Wilt Chamberlain is shrouded in mythology. Everything he did on the court, everything he did off the court.

Like the new revelation he used a Sixers’ ball-boy as the “King’s cup-bearer” — the boy tested all the soda Chamberlain drank during games because Wilt feared he would be poisoned.

Or the night in Hershey, Penn., when Chamberlain dropped 100 points on the Knicks. Part of the reason it is so mythological in modern terms is there is no film of it, we only have the stories, which get exaggerated over time.

Except there might be film of that night… but that film too is shrouded in mystery — nobody knows where it is.

All of this comes from Memphis coach Josh Pastner, who was in Philly as his Tigers took on the Temple Owls. When asked about his ties to the Philadelphia area Pastner said this eye opening stuff about Chamberlain, via The 700 Level at CSNPhilly.com.

My father was the ball boy for the 76ers for many, many years, and he and Wilt Chamberlain were very close. … And Wilt Chamberlain always felt somebody was trying to get him on timeouts with assassination through drinking. And he drank 7-Up or Sprite, one of the two. And my dad always had to taste it before Wilt– He made my father drink it before [he] would taste it to make sure my dad didn’t conk out.But Wilt took care of my father. They always went around. Like my dad said, he never had a front seat; Wilt sat in the back when he was driving because his legs were so long.

And in fact, my father and his father taped the game reel-to-reel in the second quarter when it was in Hershey, Pennsylvania in the 100-point game. They started when he had like 30-something; they thought it was going to be a special night. They gave it to Wilt — the 100-point game — and Wilt gave it back to my dad and my dad’s dad. He gave it back to them, they boxed it up, and he’s still trying to find it. He’s got all kinds of boxes, and he doesn’t know if he lost it. He’s trying to find the sucker. … I mean he’s got jerseys of Wilt, pictures.

Is that true?

Who knows? Who cares? It’s Wilt Chamberlain, where the myth is way more fun than the reality (the reality being he scored 100 points because his teammates kept setting him up at the end of an already decided game, and the Sixers would foul the other team to stop the clock and get the ball back to get him points).

Personally, I’d rather believe the myth of Chamberlain. So for me, this is all true. Even if it isn’t.

  1. yousuxxors - Jan 12, 2014 at 6:40 PM

    I agree its all true. I heard he’s the father of 40% of the NBA

    • bkbell3 - Jan 13, 2014 at 9:57 AM

      ya. Wilt was so fond of his father[the ball boy] that he would rather see the kid die from poison than drink it himself? Yea, this guy has a lot of credibility smh

  2. dinofrank60 - Jan 12, 2014 at 7:17 PM

    Moat people nowadays have never seen Wilt play. So he is mythical.

    • davcup1 - Jan 13, 2014 at 7:25 PM

      Are those “Moat people” part of the “Boat People” from Hanoi? I’m easily confused…..:-))

  3. csilojohnson - Jan 12, 2014 at 7:21 PM

    I just ate some pizza. It was good.
    Thats the truth.

  4. 00maltliquor - Jan 12, 2014 at 7:21 PM

    He ain’t got sh__. Just don’t even bring it up unless you can produce it. I’d kill to see the 100 point game! I wanna compare it to Kobe’s 81 (I feel the 81 is more impressive. Playing against today’s athletes, a 6″6 SG as opposed to a giant playing against a bunch of “midgets”, etc.)

    • macka4 - Jan 13, 2014 at 2:08 AM

      While the Knicks weren’t good, Toronto (Kobe’s 81 opponent) was one of the worst teams in league history. I believe they won less than 20 games that yr. Kobe’s 62 vs a decent, solid Dallas team (in 3 quarters) is more impressive than his 81 pt game.

      • svupper - Jan 13, 2014 at 9:56 AM

        Yet no one eles were close to scoring 81 on Toronto that season.. Im not a Kobe fan, but i gotta agree.. Kobe’s 81 IMO is more impressive than Wilt’s 100.. So untill i see that 100 point game and the video show otherwise, i gotta stick with Kobe :)

      • asimonetti88 - Jan 13, 2014 at 1:29 PM

        The Raptors were not a good team that year, but they were certainly not “one of the worst teams in league history”. They won 27 games, and finished ahead of Charlotte, Atlanta, New York, and Portland.

    • antistratfordian - Jan 13, 2014 at 2:59 AM

      A few things to consider:

      - 81 is not exactly close to 100.

      Michael Jordan (69), Elgin Baylor (71), David Robinson (71) and David Thompson (73) are all closer to Kobe than Kobe is to Wilt. For some reason certain Lakers fans like to put Wilt and Kobe in one group and everyone else in another – it should be Wilt in his own group and everyone else in another.

      - Imagine Kobe trying to score 80 points without a three point line.

      Kobe shot 13 threes and made 7 of them. He had an option that guys like Wilt or David Thompson didn’t have – to score more points faster with a certain shot. David Thompson scored 73 points without a three point line – this is probably where Kobe would’ve ended up without that option.

      - Wilt made 28 of 32 free throw attempts – he’s a career 51% FT shooter.

      A minor miracle.

      - The biggest and most physically intimidating player on the 2006 Raptors was Chris Bosh (who fouled out).

      Darrell Imhoff, the Knicks starting center in 1962, was 6’10 220 – close to Bosh’s size – he wasn’t a “midget.” Imagine Roy Hibbert at 7’2 278 (bigger and taller than Wilt Chamberlain) scoring 100 points on the Miami Heat – that is kind of like what Wilt did to the Knicks. The idea was as completely absurd then as it is now.

      - Wilt had 100 points, 25 rebounds and 2 assists.

      … and who knows how many blocks. Kobe had 81 points, 6 rebounds and 2 assists. 2 assists makes sense for a center.

      - Wilt only scored 100 points because his teammates wanted him to.

      Wilt’s teammates were more enthusiastic about him scoring 100 than he was. According to Richie Guerin, Chamberlain was embarrassed by it. But the crowd kept chanting “Give it to Wilt!” and his teammates enjoyed obliging them. When the game was over it was a teammate who took the game ball and ran it into the locker room and zipped it into Wilt’s gym bag. The crowd also rushed the floor to celebrate Wilt’s achievement. In the locker room every player on the team signed the game ball. It felt like a team accomplishment to them (because it really was).

      Another incredible example of Wilt’s teammate’s enthusiasm is what Joe Ruklik wanted to do at the free throw line in the final minute of the game. Ruklik rarely played and rarely scored – but Wilt was sitting on 98 points – so Ruklik told Wilt that he was going to try to miss on purpose so Wilt could get the rebound and reach 100. Wilt told him not to do it, so it didn’t go down like that – but it was a great selfless gesture.

      Contrast that to what Kobe was doing in Toronto late in the game – often taking the ball the length of the court by himself, jacking up shots, just trying to score more points for himself in a game that is already a blowout. Is it any wonder that his teammates weren’t more enthusiastic during that game? Have you ever seen a less enthusiastic group of teammates for something that is supposed to be special? After he scores 81 and walks back to the bench there is no celebration – just a few teammates walk up to bump knuckles, some light hugging. Raptors fans were more excited than his own team!

      That’s the difference between a ball dominating guard eclipsing 80 points and a big man approaching that number – a guard like Kobe does it out of selfishness and distrust, a big man is only allowed to do it because of the selflessness and trust of his teammates.

      (Indeed, Kobe made 28 shots, but his teammates only totaled 16 assists. A lot of iso gunning from Bryant. The Warriors point guard had 20 assists by himself – most of them to Wilt.)

      - Cultural impact.

      As one author wrote, “The hundred-point game was a revolutionary act—if not by intention then by effect—that announced the NBA was a white man’s enclave no more. Against the Knickerbockers in Hershey, the Dipper symbolically blew to smithereens the NBA owners’ arbitrary quota that limited the number of black players.”

      Meanwhile, in Eagle, Colorado…

      • Mas - Jan 14, 2014 at 1:27 AM

        Incredibly stupid comment. Kobe had a 3-pointer to benefit from? So what? Wilt would’ve never used it regardless if it was present or not. It would be relevant if we were talking about KC Jones or Jerry West, but using something that Wilt would’ve never used himself as a reasoning device isn’t fair at all.

        Wilt was taller and more athletic than anyone else on the floor in that game. The guy guarding him was 6’10. Cool. He was also a second year player. 6’6 Dave Budd was also guarding him in that game, but you won’t hear about that.

        Kobe’s team was down 14 points in the third quarter. Wilt’s was a blowout. Kobe single-handedly brought his team back to win the game. That’s “selfish” and trying to “score points for himself”? I would agree if they were up, but in this case the Lakers were DOWN 14 points and Kobe brought them back. So take your “selfish” comments and stick’em where the sun don’t shine.

        Wilt scored 59.2% of his teams 169 points. Kobe scored 66.4% of his teams 122 points. Wilt played in a lane that was only 12 feet wide. Kobe played in a lane that is 16 feet wide. Wilt shot 57% from the field (36-63) as a CENTER. Kobe shot 60% from the field (28-46) as a SHOOTING GUARD. In Wilt’s 100-point game, he wasn’t guarded by anyone taller than 6-10. In Kobe’s 81 point game, at least 4 Raptor players are listed at least 6-10. Wilt played in an era where there was no zone defense, Kobe scored 81 in a more sophisticated defensive era, where zone is legal. Wilt played the entire game. Kobe sat out the last 6 minutes in his.

      • antistratfordian - Jan 14, 2014 at 7:10 PM

        Your point about the threes is irrelevant. Even if someone wanted to score three points with one shot, they simply did not have that option until 1979-80. Elgin Baylor set the scoring record in 1960 with 71 points – and Baylor could shoot – so what would he have scored with a three point option? He also grabbed 25 rebounds. He was shorter than Kobe.

        You could argue that Kobe’s 81 point game was not even as impressive as Baylor’s record setting game.

        So could Kobe could score 80 points without a three point shot? Probably not.

        Kobe single-handedly brought his team back to win the game. That’s “selfish” and trying to “score points for himself”?

        The Lakers were already up by 17 points with about 3 minutes left. You think he took 5-6 more shots with 0 assists in the final 3 minutes out of necessity? 6 shots in the last 3 minutes of a 17 point game? If he was shooting at that rate for the entire game he would’ve taken 90 shots. What was the reason for that? He was not close to any record – he had already broken the Lakers single game record – so why was he chucking so much at that point?

        Indeed, the Lakers were up 120-102 with 40 seconds left and Kobe was STILL shooting. The Lakers won by 18 and he didn’t even come off the floor until the final buzzer sounded.

        Wilt played the entire game. Kobe sat out the last 6 minutes in his.

        Kobe played the entire fourth quarter.

        My larger point was that Wilt reached 100 with the blessing, and by the direct efforts, of his teammates. Kobe’s teammates, on the other hand, would’ve preferred if he passed more – par for the course with him. So, if we really want to get down to it, Kobe’s effort, at its core, was regrettable as it spawned a whole legion of selfish young ballers wishing to also play the game the wrong way.

        …and there was nothing sophisticated about the Raptors defense in 2006.

      • pbinlostangeles - Jan 14, 2014 at 3:00 PM

        And we won’t bring Pete into the equatio. At the guard position? Not even close Maravich would be – with the 3 point line in place- the third al-time leading scorer in the NBA.
        And lets not forget that other SIGNIFICANT factor. What if Wilt, Kareem, Maravich et al had come stright out of high school? Wilt’s numbers would be WAAAAAYYY out of reach.
        Nice post antistratfordian.
        Here’some more goodies for you:Chamberlain’s team losses to Celtic teams were an aggregate of less than 25 points, including a last second miracle shot by Sam Jones in 1962 to beat the Sixers by one point.
        Forty years after he retired at the age of 37, Chamberlain’s name appears in the NBA’s record book 97 times; when he retired following the 1972-73 season, it was 128 times. Wilt and Bill Russell played against each other 142 times throughout their careers. In those head-to-head match-ups, Wilt averaged 28.7 points and 28.7 rebounds while Russell posted averages of 14.5 and 23.7. Russell was distraught in the game when Wilt grabbed 55 – FIFTY-Five – rebounds against him; Wilt dominated the paint, taking everything in sight. That 55 rebound record still stands today and no one will come near it.
        Wilt scored 135 points in a 24 hour span – 73 against the Bulls and 62 points against the Celtics. It took 22 years for someone to score 50 or more points on consecutive nights. Bernard King did it – back to back 50’s – versus San Antonio and Dallas in 1984.
        Wilt scored 50 or more points 118 times in his career; Michael Jordan is second with 31. Twenty different players have scored 60 or more points in an NBA game. Only four players have scored 60 points on more than one occasion: Wilt 32 times, Jordan five times, Kobe five times, and Elgin Baylor four times.
        Everyone makes a big fuss out of a triple double. How about a triple double-double, which Wilt did against the Pistons in 1968! Wilt’s line from that game – 22 points, 25 rebounds and 21 assists.
        Never fouled out of a game; high school, college, professional!

      • pbinlostangeles - Jan 14, 2014 at 3:05 PM

        What a LOT people don’t know as well, is at the time of Russell and Wilt et al, the NBA had a “territorial draft” pick stipulation, wherein the franchise closest to where the player attended college – also a mandatory requirement of the time – had first right to draft that player; that’s how Wilt ended up in Philly. Despite all the rhetoric, Auerbach would have snatched him up in a minute, had he been able to…

      • Jordan - Jan 18, 2014 at 5:03 AM

        Way to avoid the point. We’re talking about Wilt here. You brought up Wilt. Not Elgin Baylor. Wilt would’ve never used the 3-point line. That’s a fact. There’s really no point arguing how it was an unfair advantage to Kobe considering he would’ve never used it anyways. Case closed.

        I’m laughing at the fact that you still consider Kobe’s game selfish, even though he had 62 in the Dallas game and sat out the entire fourth. But okay, he’s “selfish”. He could’ve easily gone for an 80 point game at that point, but instead chose to sit out.

        Kobe was busy bringing his team back from a double-digit deficit, but you choose to nit-pick the final few minutes of him still shooting as evidence that he was “selfish”. How desperate can you get? Can’t forget the fact that two nights later, Chamberlain tried going for 100 points AGAIN, but Imhoff held him to 54 points. Of course if Kobe tried going for 81 points again, you’d bash him to no end.

        “Kobe’s teammates, on the other hand, would’ve preferred if he passed more”

        To who? Kwame Brown? Smush Parker? Chris Mihm? Why do you think they were down in the first place? Stop riding Wilt so hard. It’s clouding your judgment.

        Yes, and there was nothing sophisticated about being guarded by a 6’6 player.

      • antistratfordian - Jan 18, 2014 at 5:57 PM

        Wilt would’ve never used the 3-point line.

        Well we don’t actually know that because the 3-point line didn’t exist. Wilt was fond of his fade-away shot – he had a jumper that he loved shooting (he said he probably used it too much instead of attacking the rim all the time). But if he grew up in a world where the 3-point line existed he may have wanted to shoot a few of them. We can’t say for sure what he would’ve done, can we? No, we can’t.

        I’m laughing at the fact that you still consider Kobe’s game selfish, even though he had 62 in the Dallas game and sat out the entire fourth. But okay, he’s “selfish”. He could’ve easily gone for an 80 point game at that point, but instead chose to sit out.

        For one thing, Kobe is a selfish person – not just a selfish player. And every game he plays is selfish – even when he’s trying to rack up assists, he does it selfishly. With Kobe everything is calculated from the perspective of “what can bring me the most personal glory.” This is why, last year, we saw Kobe all alone on a fast break – stop, turn around to look for a teammate – and pitch the ball back to a trailer for a slam. At the time he was on some sort of double digit assist streak, and Kobe was thinking about the additional figure in the box score and what type of personal statement a higher assist total would make, rather than just playing the game naturally (take the uncontested layup). Yeah, it’s an assist, but it’s a selfish assist.

        And also, Kobe didn’t “choose” to sit out of the Dallas game. He was taken out. Phil Jackson was actually going to take him out of the Toronto game as well, but an assistant coach warned him that Kobe would be furious (again, Kobe’s ego and selfishness coming into play). So the only reason he was left in the Toronto game is because Jackson didn’t want to deal with his immaturity.

        How desperate can you get? Can’t forget the fact that two nights later, Chamberlain tried going for 100 points AGAIN, but Imhoff held him to 54 points. Of course if Kobe tried going for 81 points again, you’d bash him to no end.

        Chamberlain was a center shooting over 50% that season. If he touches the ball it’s going to be very close to the basket – where he is supposed to shoot it! There was no three point line at the time so it made less sense to kick the ball back out for a long two. But that’s the whole objective of an offense – to get the ball in the best position to score (high percentage shot, close to the basket, preferably).

        Kobe, on the other hand, handles the ball a lot, brings the ball up sometimes, was mostly perimeter based, obviously, and was only shooting 45%. So what we saw most of the time that season was Kobe hogging the ball and missing shots – missing a lot of them. He could only get to 60 points in 3 quarters by playing selfishly – there is no other way to accomplish that for a ball dominator like him.

        To who? Kwame Brown? Smush Parker? Chris Mihm? Why do you think they were down in the first place?

        Yeah, to his teammates. That’s what they’re there for – a great player learns how to turn his teammates into threats. And Lamar Odom was not a bad player. But Kobe was busy forcing about 30 shots a game – learning the hard way. And, if we’re being honest, even after 17-18 years Kobe still hasn’t learned how to play the game the right way.

    • davcup1 - Jan 13, 2014 at 7:30 PM

      00: The Lollipop Guild is going to hunt you down and lick you to death. Oh wait the last one died last week. Sorry about that……:-))

    • pbinlostangeles - Jan 14, 2014 at 2:55 PM

      00maltliquor60: With all due respect, and I mean that sincerely – I‘m a lifelong (55+ years) Lakers fan – “today’s athletes” and the entire “modern era” argument is WAY over blown. Consider the following:
      If the 3 point line had been in place in the NBA, commensurate with when it was implemented in the ABA – 67/68 season – there would have been a much larger number of former NBA players today included in or near the 81+ point club – George Gervin, World B. Free, Bob McAdoo, David Thompson and most certainly Pete Maravich to name but 5.
      In particular, had the three point line been in place during Pete’s career, Pete would be the third leading all-time NBA scorer. We won’t even discuss what the greats of the past would have done, had they been allowed to go straight to the NBA out of high school; people today forget about that little difference.
      Video tape of Maravich’ NBA games prior to his knee injury, researched by long time LSU coach Dale Brown indicate Pete would have had at least 10 games of 80 or more points, against hall of fame players like Walt Frazier, Dave Bing, and Jerry West among others. You say Kobe got 81 against “today’s athletes” lets have a look at the Raptors of 2006, with all those hall of famers; you kidding me?
      Darrall Imhoff had the unfortunate assignment of guarding Wilt on the 100 point night; Imhoff was listed at 6’11” 235 lbs. and was a two-time all American, he got “help” that night from former UCLA all-American Willie Naulls, 6’7” 230 lbs.
      And lastly, thinking about the mythical “modern era” – The top 3 regular season rebounders from the 2012/2013 season, compared to the top 3 regular season rebounders form the 71/72 season.
      Top three, RPG 2013, regular season: Dwight Howard – 12.4 rpg. , Nikola Vucevic – 11.9 rpg. And, Omer Asik – 11.7 rpg.
      The top three – all Hall of Fame – RPG 1971/72: Wilt (36 years of age) 19.2 rpg. Wes Unseld – 17.6 rpg. And Kareem (Who also led the NBA in scoring) 16.6 rpg.
      Now, you tell ME which era was stiffer competition…..Peace

      • 00maltliquor - Jan 14, 2014 at 6:28 PM

        Much, much respect to you my man. You’ve seen a lot of great ball in your time, I’m sure.

        I get what you’re saying but 3 point line or not, it wouldn’t have mattered when it comes to Wilt. His points came in the paint. Plus your fun fact that Imhoff’s help came in the form of 6”7 Willie Naulls, former All-American or not. 6”7 is 6”7. “Midget” big. Wilt was 7”1, athletic and skilled as heck. And Darryl Imhoff was listed as 6”10, 220. Those boys wern’t touching The Stilt. At all.

        Plus to counter your argument with the old school gaudy rebound numbers…no 3 seconds in the paint, correct? Correct me if I’m wrong.

  5. soonermagic284 - Jan 12, 2014 at 7:24 PM

    WOW! How big would that be? IMO wilt is the GOAT. I hope the film is uncovered, always been fascinated by the 100 point game.

  6. chucknorrissinspiration - Jan 12, 2014 at 7:26 PM

    Sonny Jurgensen(former redskins qb)has vouched for the 100 point game. He also has said he was the second leading scorer that night as he dropped 39 in the earlier game of the double header that night.

  7. mungman69 - Jan 12, 2014 at 7:29 PM

    Chamberlain > Russell

    • pbinlostangeles - Jan 14, 2014 at 3:08 PM

      Chamberlain’s team losses to Celtic teams were an aggregate of less than 25 points, including a last second miracle shot by Sam Jones in 1962 to beat the Sixers by one point.
      Forty years after he retired at the age of 37, Chamberlain’s name appears in the NBA’s record book 97 times; when he retired following the 1972-73 season, it was 128 times. Wilt and Bill Russell played against each other 142 times throughout their careers. In those head-to-head match-ups, Wilt averaged 28.7 points and 28.7 rebounds while Russell posted averages of 14.5 and 23.7. Russell was distraught in the game when Wilt grabbed 55 – FIFTY-Five – rebounds against him; Wilt dominated the paint, taking everything in sight. That 55 rebound record still stands today and no one will come near it.
      Wilt scored 135 points in a 24 hour span – 73 against the Bulls and 62 points against the Celtics. It took 22 years for someone to score 50 or more points on consecutive nights. Bernard King did it – back to back 50’s – versus San Antonio and Dallas in 1984.
      Wilt scored 50 or more points 118 times in his career; Michael Jordan is second with 31. Twenty different players have scored 60 or more points in an NBA game. Only four players have scored 60 points on more than one occasion: Wilt 32 times, Jordan five times, Kobe five times, and Elgin Baylor four times.
      Everyone makes a big fuss out of a triple double. How about a triple double-double, which Wilt did against the Pistons in 1968! Wilt’s line from that game – 22 points, 25 rebounds and 21 assists.
      Never fouled out of a game; high school, college, professional!

  8. hightopandrocket - Jan 12, 2014 at 7:53 PM

    He was awesome in the Conan movie with Arnie, Shak shoulda studied under him before making Kazam…

  9. themagicfanguy - Jan 12, 2014 at 8:04 PM

    @mung Except for in the one category that matters in a sport, winning.

  10. peddealer - Jan 12, 2014 at 8:08 PM

    Chamberlain>Russell>Alcindor>O’Neal> Shawn Bradley>Oliver Miller

  11. dinofrank60 - Jan 12, 2014 at 8:34 PM

    This just shows that you can’t talk about yesterday’s athletes today. The people who care are implored to stop talking about that and enjoy what you see today, so everyone can share their thoughts. Nothing of interest happened more than twenty years ago, except for a few exceptions. For example, the birth of Michael Jordan is a important event in basketball history.

  12. phillyphannnn83 - Jan 12, 2014 at 8:50 PM

    Come on now Kurt let’s get the facts right. Wilt had nearly 70 at half time. Saying he got it all in garbage time at the end is the exact opposite of what happened.

    • Kurt Helin - Jan 13, 2014 at 7:09 PM

      I didn’t say he got it all at the end, but they did foul to get him extra shots so he could get to 100. Multiple players in the game confirmed it.

  13. 6stn - Jan 12, 2014 at 10:07 PM

    There was no Sixers team at the time. He was playing for the Philadelphia Warriors. Warriors moved to San Francisco after that season; Syracuse Nationals moved to Philadelphia, changed name to 76ers.

    • spursareold - Jan 13, 2014 at 10:10 AM

      Inefficient. They should have just moved Syracuse to San Fran.

    • 3b2btrouble - Jan 14, 2014 at 1:24 AM

      That was to be my point as well. Wilt was playing for the Philadelphia Warriors in 1962. You think a division 1 coach would get that fact straight. Now the question begs, why, if they had a video tape MACHINE as they were quite bulky back then, why did they not TAPE the entire game? If it was filmed on 8mm or 16mm, there would have been a lot of film changes as well and ORIGINALLY would not have been on a single reel. I hope he finds “it” and gets to show the world. Even if it turns out to be reel to reel audio, that would be of great historical value as well. Wilt’s 100 is still phenomenal. I’ve heard so many people here in the SF bay area media that played against him like Rick Barry and Jim Barnett who were just so in awe of that man Wilt on a basketball court. I have heard one other rumor about the court in Hershey, PA being SHORTER than NBA regulation, that may have helped the getting up and down the court go all that much faster for this record. It’s still phenomenal record even if the short court rumor is proven true.

  14. billtetley53 - Jan 12, 2014 at 10:32 PM

    Malt, you’re a friggin dope. Darrel Imhoff( the center for the Knicks in the 100 point game) was 6’10” , far from a “midget”.

    You act like Wilt, who was 7’1″, was playing against all 5’9″ guys.

    Does your weird Kobe love know no bounds?

    Wilt was 10x the athlete that Kobe is.

    You’re not very smart.

    • 00maltliquor - Jan 12, 2014 at 11:07 PM

      ARE YOU KIDDING ME?? 6”10 is a “midget” as far as C’s are concerned! Bill Russell was 6”9. That’s like Kevin Durant playing C. And no, I didn’t mean a literal midget. That’s why the word was in parenthesis. And does you’re Kobe hate know no bounds? Kobe’s 81>Wilt’s 100

      • asimonetti88 - Jan 12, 2014 at 11:21 PM

        The average center in 1965 was only 1 inch shorter than the average center in 2005.

      • macka4 - Jan 13, 2014 at 2:12 AM

        There are several big nights superior to Kobe’s 81. Even Kobe’s 62 vs a much better Dallas team (compared to that joke in Toronto) in 3 quarters. Add to that Jordan’s 69 (OT, yes) vs a solid Cavs team, Maravich’s 68 vs Knicks of Frazier, Monroe, McAdoo and Haywood. Rick Barry’s 64 vs a so-so Portland team, still with All stars Geoff Petrie and Sidney Wicks.

    • macka4 - Jan 13, 2014 at 2:06 AM

      I have no idea where these fools keep saying Wilt and Russell only had competition from each other, that centers back then were all short. A tremendous insult and oversight to Thurmond, Reed and even to an extent, Walt Bellamy, all Hall of Famers.

  15. phillysports1 - Jan 12, 2014 at 10:39 PM

    @6stn

    No matter what the team name is , it’s still PHILADELPHIA .

  16. louhudson23 - Jan 13, 2014 at 2:49 AM

    Comparing Wilt to any big man playing today….thanks…I have something to laugh at for the rest of the day…

  17. davidly - Jan 13, 2014 at 5:45 AM

    Some tape is video, but not film. Reel-to-reel tape is not video. They tape recorded audio of that game. There are no moving images. The moonlanding, on the other hand.. . ;-)

    • davidly - Jan 13, 2014 at 6:54 AM

      Stop the presses! It was vintage reel-to-reel vid after all – and how been found with the skeletal remains of a certain teamster.

  18. cheathamhouse1 - Jan 13, 2014 at 7:33 AM

    I believe that he feared that his drink would be poisoned. Wilt received a lot of hate during those games…being called the n word and being spat on…it wasn’t all love…many people at those games hated him…a side that we would like to forget. I’m glad we have moved forward and progressed as people and now things have changed. As far as the 100 pt game footage, it seems to me that it would be worth a fortune. I would be busting my ass to find it!

  19. mogogo1 - Jan 13, 2014 at 10:20 AM

    It’d be amazing to watch the tape of that game. Talk about the stars aligning… Wilt somehow managed to go 28 of 32 from the foul line that night. But as amazing as the 100-point game is, I still think his averaging 50 for a season is the more incredible feat.

  20. billtetley53 - Jan 13, 2014 at 2:57 PM

    macka: Yep, by using malts line of reasoning, here is a list of “midgets” that center played in Wilts time:

    6-9 Willis Reed
    6-11 Nate Thurmond
    6-10 Clyde Lovellette
    6-11 Walt Bellamy
    6-9 Bill Russel

    Then there are these guys from later:
    6-10 Hakeem Olajuwon
    6-10 Moses Malone
    6-9 Dan Issel
    6-7 Wes Unseld

    Every single one of those guys is a “midget” for the center position….every single one of those guts is a hall of famer who excelled and out played the “giant” 7 footers of their times.

    Wilt was triple teamed a lot of the time. Wilt was one of the best conditioned athletes ever and to disparage him by comparing him to Kobe is ludicrous.

    Kobe didn’t deal with anything near Wilt as far as defense goes.

    By the way, the Knicks were a 29 win team in a 9 team league.

    Malt I suggest you do some reading, it might open your biased eyes, I doubt it, but it might. Start with Terry Plutos book, its told in a quotation format, from former players etc. point of view.

    Its sad that the 60s and 70s players don’t get their just due. The sportscenter generation just doesn’t respect the history of sports…

  21. peddealer - Jan 14, 2014 at 2:05 AM

    Screw you Kurt, sitting on your fat judgmental ass, trying to find a credible reason to smite the mighty Wilt.

    I would love to see a game of Kurt versus Anyone at basketball, but if you look at him his only opponents are donuts, fast food desserts, and convenience store candy.

    • Kurt Helin - Jan 14, 2014 at 6:13 PM

      If you’re in the LBC you can see me play pickup in my regular game once to twice a week.

      And I’m a Wilt fan, met him back in the day when I would play beach volleyball at the same beach he used to. That doesn’t mean his 100 point game was in the natural flow of the contest.

  22. justjay128 - Jan 14, 2014 at 10:13 AM

    Not even kidding, I know a guy who has a ticket stub from this game. I’m 25 years old and as a youngster, 12-16, I would go to a local rec gym to play pickup basketball. There was always on old man named Frank, who was known to be homeless and rode a bike with plastic bags in it with his thrift store or hand me down clothes. Anyways, he always played pickup and would always shoot hook shots, one handed shots, he could kick a ball from the 3 point line and make it…he obviously was a good player in his younger days and you could tell the era of basketball he grew up in by the way he played. We would always play horse and he would always shoot one handed and it kill me..hated losing to this old man. He’d always tell me about this game and how he was there and how the ticket stub was the prize posession in his life. I never believed him until one day I finally beat him in a game of Horse so he showed it to me. There inside his wallet was the stub, crinkled, old and tattered. I always would tell him he should sell it to a collecto and it help get him back on his feet. But he always said no way and I’m sure wherever he is he’s still carrying around that stub like a pruized jewel right up next to his ID, scratch lotto tickets and little money he has. Just a cool story of what that game and night meant to somebody

    • 00maltliquor - Jan 14, 2014 at 6:46 PM

      That’s an incredible story. Cool that you shared it. That has a “straight from the movies” feel to it.

  23. brianekern - Jan 14, 2014 at 7:13 PM

    I don’t see anyone even mention pace. If you normalize pace, Wilt’s (and everyone else from the era) numbers become far more pedestrian.

    Watch a game from back then, it’s just a lot running back and forth. Very little half-court offense going on and the defense is pretty horrible. I think the Bucks of today would wipe the floor with Wilt’s or Russel’s teams. Wilt was a great center, but there’s no way he is scoring even close 100 in today’s game.

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