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Domestic violence charges against Celtics’ Sullinger dropped

Oct 28, 2013, 4:58 PM EDT

Jared Sullinger AP

We tell you when these cases come up, it’s only right we also tell you when they go away.

Which is what happened in the case of Celtics second-year player Jared Sullinger. On Aug. 31 he had a fight with his girlfriend and a few days later he was arrested and eventually arraigned on charges of assault and battery, destruction of property, and intimidation of a witness.

However, from the start Sullinger’s girlfriend, Deann Smith, asked that the charges be dropped, and she eventually got her way, reports Masslive.com (hat tip to Royce at EOB).

Smith has repeatedly asked that the charges be dropped, and it was her refusal to testify against Sullinger that ultimately led to the case’s conclusion. Through her attorney, Smith informed the Middlesex District Attorney Marian T. Ryan’s office that she would exercise her Fifth Amendment rights if called as a witness.

No witness, no case.

Since we don’t know the details of what happened and it is between Sullinger and Smith, I’m not going to comment beyond that. Here is the statement Sullinger gave after his arrest.

“I voluntarily reported to the Waltham police this morning to respond to charges against me. The experience was humbling and embarrassing for me. Yet I know that this situation has brought both sorrow and embarrassment to my girlfriend, my family, the Boston Celtics organization, my teammates, and my fans. To all of you, I apologize from the bottom of my heart.”

  1. j0esixpack - Oct 28, 2013 at 8:37 PM

    Good of you to give the coverage of the dropped charges

    And good of you to re-run his statement.

    That’s much more than other media outlets typically do.

    Of course none of us know what really happened. There are numerous cases where the abused feel compelled to drop charges or not pursue charges against an abuser. That doesn’t mean abuse didn’t occur.

    So too does law enforcement err on the side of the alleged victim when these allegations are made – whether abuse truly happened or not.

    But Sullinger still should be considered innocent until proven guilty – and I’ll give him credit for trying to take on the allegations head on with his original statement.

    It’s an unfortunate situation no matter how you slice it

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