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Manu Ginobili pretty excited about Argentinian pope

Mar 14, 2013, 4:33 PM EDT

VATICAN-POPE-MASS-SISTINE Getty Images

Until Wednesday, if you asked people from Argentina about God, you probably got an answer about Lionel Messi.

But now Argentina is buzzing because Buenos Aires native and Cardinal Jorge Mario Begoglio is now Pope Francis, the head of the Catholic Church worldwide.

Among those pretty excited is Argentina’s greatest basketball player Manu Ginobili, who was practicing with the San Antonio Spurs before Thursday’s game against Dallas, and talked about the pope, according to Spurs Nation at the Express-News.

“It is incredible,” Ginobili said after this morning’s shootaround. “We were watching and when we heard the name I said, ‘What? Did we hear it right?’

“We were all in shock. The country is going crazy….

“An Argentinean being in charge of a billion people is not something that happens often,” Ginobili said. “Catholicism is the main religion in my country and, of course, it is a big thing.”

So if Ginobili hits some miracle shots in the playoffs, or just seems to get all the calls, we can now blame someone higher up than David Stern.

  1. sasquash20 - Mar 14, 2013 at 4:55 PM

    Hopefully he will let more women have prominent roles in the church. Maybe then they can stop all the priest from hurting little boys and screwing the whole life up. Sick bastards

    • money2long - Mar 14, 2013 at 5:22 PM

      calling the pope such things…amazing how people really have no filters. if you are able to address him in that manner shows a lot about your character. an insult back to you wouldn’t affect you because you’ve probably heard them all.

      sad.

      • circuscivics - Mar 14, 2013 at 5:25 PM

        The pope is not a God (although the way he is worshipped you would think he is). If you are allowed to call your president a bastard, why not the pope?

      • savvybynature - Mar 14, 2013 at 5:49 PM

        Bastards is plural, so not sure why you even think that was directed at the pope as opposed to those who have molested children or helped cover up the problem.

        Seems like you are kinda defensive. I guess if my religion was unwilling to address such atrocities within its own house I would be defensive too. Nah, actually I would just say they deserved the name calling, which pales in comparison to the acts committed, and demand more accountability from those in power. But we all have our coping mechanisms.

      • money2long - Mar 14, 2013 at 7:04 PM

        comparing the president to the pope? wow

      • tuberippin - Mar 15, 2013 at 12:28 AM

        Let me make this easier for you:

        1) I am not Catholic
        2) I am not religious (that does not mean I am amoralistic; religion is not the only source of morals)
        3) I have no respect for any group of people who unequivocally permit grown, well-aged men to consort with young boys.

        Just because those within the Catholic denomination feel that the Pope is the voice of God on Earth and is infallible (although if you’re allowed to rescind your post as the voice of God amongst men, clearly you’re fallible and you present God as being a fallible entity as well) does not mean his actions, or the actions of the Catholic Church more generally, are beyond reproach.

        Furthermore, if insulting a person in power (and it’s not really an insult when it is a fact, and it is a fact that the Catholic Church covered up a hierarchy of child molestation) is considered to be a demonstration of one’s character, then I would like to ask you what the composition of the Papacy’s character is, being that they roundly condemn birth control, even in areas like sub-Saharan Africa (where the rate of HIV transmission is so high that it brings the life expectancy of the general population down several decades from the rest of the world)…not to mention the recent abhorrent scandal involving children.

      • kavika6 - Mar 15, 2013 at 5:51 AM

        I’m not Catholic but I don’t think the child molestation problems in the Catholic church are any worse than in the American (worldwide) medical system.

  2. akmgiants - Mar 14, 2013 at 5:22 PM

    Isn’t ginobli atheist?

    • Kevin S. - Mar 14, 2013 at 6:07 PM

      I am too, but that doesn’t mean we can’t recognize the scope and power of an organization as massive as the RCC, and having an Argentine pope *does* mean that the needs and cares of Latin America will receive greater focus now.

      • akmgiants - Mar 14, 2013 at 8:41 PM

        Yeah i’m an atheist too. I definitely understand where he’s coming from, though. I have some affinity for the church, especially compared to other christian denominations. work over faith

      • davidly - Mar 15, 2013 at 9:08 AM

        While a retro-conservative worldview is not a surprise coming from any pope, this one’s collaboration with the junta from ’76-’83 and selling out of his Jesuit brothers would indicate that any focus Latin America receives from this guy will not be towards the cares and concerns of the average person.

        Let’s not kid ourselves, not only are popes not holy men, sometimes they are outright atrocious.

    • phaden27 - Mar 14, 2013 at 7:29 PM

      Hope so.
      I get a little tired of athletes thanking God when they win and blaming themselves when they lose.
      Having faith is cool if it’s your thing, but hey give yourself a little credit.

      • tuberippin - Mar 15, 2013 at 12:32 AM

        I’m just waiting on the first ultra-religious athlete to blame God for the athlete’s own personal failures.

        Whenever they perform well, it’s “Gotta give thanks to the Lord for helping me out on this one”, but whenever they perform poorly, it’s “this was all my fault”.

      • Kevin S. - Mar 15, 2013 at 12:57 AM

        I think Stevie Johnson blamed god for a drop-filled game a couple years back.

  3. frankenderek - Mar 14, 2013 at 5:27 PM

    I would totally call out the pope about the child abuse.

  4. dirtydavis - Mar 14, 2013 at 5:43 PM

    Pope John Paul II > Pope Francis

    • savvybynature - Mar 14, 2013 at 5:51 PM

      Average good person who lives humble life > every pope ever.

      • dirtydavis - Mar 14, 2013 at 5:59 PM

        Good person who lives humble life >Average good person who lives humble life

  5. roanboon - Mar 14, 2013 at 6:36 PM

    A Hofstra University study found that 10% of public school children are sexually abused before they leave the 12th grade. Are all teachers sick bastards? Not at all. Many do wonderful things, work hard, and change lives; but a select few cast a negative shadow on the majority.

    • Kevin S. - Mar 14, 2013 at 8:10 PM

      Do public school administrators systemically cover up the abuse, shift abusers around instead of firing them or reporting them to the authorities, bully and extort the victims into silence? Do the states and national Departments of Education get involved in coordinating the cover-up and silencing the victims? The problem isn’t just the abuse, it’s how consistently the Church has put its own image above the destroyed lives of the victims.

      • thempokes - Mar 14, 2013 at 8:43 PM

        Actually….

        http://www.educationnews.org/education-policy-and-politics/hold-unions-responsible-for-covering-up-abuse-says-eag/

      • kavika6 - Mar 15, 2013 at 5:54 AM

        Hospitals do.

  6. BigBeachBall - Mar 14, 2013 at 10:17 PM

    if it isn’t made in america, then i don’t like it… except brazilian chicks…

    • 00maltliquor - Mar 15, 2013 at 1:29 AM

      lol!

  7. 00maltliquor - Mar 15, 2013 at 1:33 AM

    Serious question…

    I don’t know much about catholisism, but…why does the pope have to change his name? How’d he go from Begoglio to Francis?

    I would really like to know. And that one pope John Paul II, was that not really his name?

    • phaden27 - Mar 15, 2013 at 12:42 PM

      I haven’t been a catholic for a long time, but what I remember is that a pope doesn’t neccesarily have to change his name once he’s chosen. Usually they change their names to those of previous Popes, for instance John Paul II was the second because his predecessor was John Paul I.
      Some of these names have meanings as far as change, faith, and hope, so it’s somewhat of a tone setter for the new Popes arrival and what his rule will be like.
      Anyway, Wikipedia has some good stuff on it if you want to know more.

      • 00maltliquor - Mar 18, 2013 at 1:02 PM

        Thanks man! I’m hitting wiki up right now…

  8. BigBeachBall - Apr 20, 2013 at 10:58 AM

  9. BigBeachBall - Apr 20, 2013 at 10:59 AM

    http://www.priceancestry.com/draft.jpg

  10. BigBeachBall - Apr 20, 2013 at 11:01 AM
  11. BigBeachBall - Apr 20, 2013 at 11:04 AM

    [img]http://www.priceancestry.com/draft.jpg[/img]

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