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Referee caught telling D’Antoni, Popovich he is stalling for television (VIDEO)

Jan 10, 2013, 8:40 AM EDT

Veteran referee Billy Kennedy clearly didn’t know he had a hot mic… which makes this all the better. Just let it serve as another reminder that television rules everything. EVERYTHING.

Seconds after Kennedy said this the broadcast went to a commercial, but not until Mike Breen has a good “you’re not fooling anybody” moment on air.

What happened is get one 20-second timeout a half and Mike D’Antoni used his in the third quarter. Apparently he called a second one but then was assessed a full timeout. The broadcast had treated this as a 20 and not a full and apparently didn’t get in enough or was a little behind on commercials to be shown. Kennedy knows television rules everything and tries to subtly stall and explain it to D’Antoni and Gregg Popovich. Except it’s not all that subtle now.

Thanks to The Point Forward for the video.

 

  1. charlutes - Jan 10, 2013 at 9:22 AM

    This is not new. In the NHL there is a guy who sits beside the penalty box at every game, and turns a light off to signal the refs when the commercial break has ended.

    • LPad - Jan 10, 2013 at 10:41 AM

      That’s what I hate about going to games in any sport. The players are ready to go after a timeout, but they always have to wait for TV. NFL is the worst. 60 minutes action surrounded by 150 min of commercials.

      • zerole00 - Jan 10, 2013 at 11:14 AM

        I always wondered about that. Even with time outs I never understood how a 60 minute game could stretch to hours. I’ve never been to a game in person, so do they just stand around during the commercials?

      • Kevin S. - Jan 10, 2013 at 11:37 AM

        It’s not just commercials, it’s the clock stoppages between plays. Run a five second play that ends with an incomplete pass or a runner going out of bounds, get forty seconds on the play clock with the game clock stopped before you have to run another one.

      • term3186 - Jan 10, 2013 at 11:47 AM

        Fun fact: On average there is about 11 minutes of game-action in every 3-4 hour NFL game.

      • eventhorizon04 - Jan 10, 2013 at 12:59 PM

        “I always wondered about that. Even with time outs I never understood how a 60 minute game could stretch to hours. I’ve never been to a game in person, so do they just stand around during the commercials?”

        The key is the 40 second play-clock that begins counting down after the previous play ends.
        If the previous play was an incomplete pass or a play that ends with the ball-carrier going out of bounds, the game-clock stops, but the players have 40 seconds until they have to run the next play. So almost a full minute goes by before the next play starts, yet there’s no time deducted from the game-clock.

        It’s more noticeable nowadays as teams have gone from running the ball 60% of the time to passing the ball 60% of the time, meaning there’s more situations where the game-clock is stopped in-between plays.

      • eventhorizon04 - Jan 10, 2013 at 1:09 PM

        “Fun fact: On average there is about 11 minutes of game-action in every 3-4 hour NFL game”

        Saying there’s only 11 minutes of game-action in an NFL game implies that player substitutions and audibles to new formations/plays don’t count as game-action because the ball isn’t snapped. If you understand football, even before the ball is snapped, there’s plenty to see – what personnel does the offense have on the field: 2-TE? 4-WR? Goal-line?

        What personnel does the defense have on the field : Base defense? Nickel-package? Dime?
        What formation is the offense lined up in: Shotgun? I-formation? Pistol?
        What formation is the defense lined up in: Cover-2? Cover-1? If you see blitz, is it a double-A gap blitz? Overload to the left/right side? How about an all-out blitz?

        That’s all part of the “game-action” even though the ball isn’t snapped yet.

        Saying there’s only 11 minutes of game-action in the NFL because that’s the time between the snap and the whistle that ends the play is like saying everything in a basketball game leading up to a shot attempt (setting screens, multiple passes, etc.) doesn’t count as game action – only the shot attempt does. It demonstrates a lack of understanding of the game.

  2. 00maltliquor - Jan 10, 2013 at 10:13 AM

    Lol. Stu Lantz called it!

  3. klownboy - Jan 10, 2013 at 10:30 AM

    Now THAT was hilarious…

  4. LPad - Jan 10, 2013 at 10:37 AM

    That’s not Mike Breen talking. Sounds like Jon Barry. However, it is funny that ESPN is listening in on them discussing ESPN’s screw up.

  5. indianaviking - Jan 10, 2013 at 11:13 AM

    “What happened is get one 20-second timeout a half and Mike D’Antoni used his in the third quarter.”

    Holy moly, can you have at least one person read this before posting?

  6. fanofevilempire - Jan 10, 2013 at 11:40 AM

    in other news, David Sterns shoe lace became untied.
    he stopped briefly to tie it.

  7. chitownmatt - Jan 10, 2013 at 1:09 PM

    I would much rather put up with this kind of thing than players wearing signage…

  8. iamjimmyjack - Jan 10, 2013 at 1:27 PM

    Referee makes a mistake, then tries covering it up and making up for it. I got a weird feeling about this when I saw it. It sorta reiterated the feeling that when referees make a bad call on one end, they try and make up for it by calling a foul on the other team. Kennedy is a punk. I’ve never liked the guy.

  9. djjackson81 - Jan 10, 2013 at 3:25 PM

    And your story is?

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