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Syracuse guard, first-round pick Waiters shuts down workouts

Jun 7, 2012, 8:10 PM EDT

NCAA Basketball Tournament - Ohio State v Syracuse Getty Images

When a draft prospect shuts down his workouts, it means he got a promise from some team to take him.

It usually doesn’t happen this early in the process. However, that’s what Syracuse two-guard Dion Waiters has done, tweets Marc Spears of Yahoo.

Syracuse guard Dion Waiters canceled all team workouts and interviews at NBA pre-draft camp, source tells Y! Sports

Waiters met with teams for interviews on the first night of the NBA Draft Combine in Chicago then shut everything down on Thursday. There have been questions about his character and commitment to defense, but he must have impressed someone.

He got a promise. We don’t know from whom (yet), but he got one or he wouldn’t shut it down like this. He is a guy that has been all over draft boards — while some have him in the top 10 Draft Express has him falling out of the lottery to No. 17. But Top 10 seems high for a guy who was the sixth man on his college team.

Waiters is a bit small for an NBA two guard but as anyone who watched Syracuse last year can tell you he can flat out get to the rim. He attacks and is a strong guy on the drive. He lines to make plays in transition and attack in that setting. He has physical tools (although at 6’4” is a bit small for an NBA two guard).

If he can develop a steady jumper he can provide real value as a scorer in the NBA. And apparently somebody thinks he can.

  1. cosanostra71 - Jun 7, 2012 at 8:55 PM

    top 10 is pretty high for someone who was sixth man in college… as proved by Marvin Williams.

  2. dalucks - Jun 7, 2012 at 9:00 PM

    The myth that the average shooting guard is 6’6 maybe true but outside of Kobe Bryant, the rest of the top 5 are under 6’6. Dwayne Wade, Monta Ellis, James Harden, Eric Gordon are not 6’6 but they sure do score a lot of points. I wish scouts and the media would spend more time talking about a player’s skill level instead of an intangible that does not properly describe a players chances of making it in the NBA.

    • dacapt704 - Jun 8, 2012 at 9:51 AM

      Great points! Size doesnt seem to affect Jason Terry, Jamal Crawford or Manu Ginobli either..only thing height means is that you need bigger doorways in your home.

    • cosanostra71 - Jun 8, 2012 at 4:04 PM

      a lot of people would argue that even Kobe isn’t 6’6″. Having seen him in person once before, I’d peg him closer to 6’4″-6’5″.

  3. mungman69 - Jun 7, 2012 at 10:37 PM

    When he played high school ball in Burlington, N. J. he didn’t even try to play defense. But then again he didn’t have to. At Syracuse he played a little D but in the pros they will eat him alive.

  4. ss3walkman - Jun 8, 2012 at 12:18 AM

    Agree with Dalucks. Marcus Thornton is another undersized two guard who scores

  5. sigma1575 - Jun 9, 2012 at 3:13 AM

    Dalucks has his “fact’ wrong. NBA idea for SG is 6-5 and 6-6 is just better if possible. Kobe 6-5, Harden 6-5, Manu 6-5, JR Smith 6-5, Jamal Crawford 6-5, Jason Richardson 6-6, Rip Hamilton 6-6. Kevin Martin 6-7 and the list goes on and on.
    Air Jordan and Vince Carter 6-6. Sean Elliot and McGrady 6-8. Ellis just got traded because he is 6-2 or 6-3. Jet Terry is a 6th man but has never worked well as a starter because of his lack of size at 6-2. Top that off with Thornton is not in the top 25 SGs in the NBA.
    Sure, some guys make it as undersized a little at 6-4 but very seldom at 6-3. Waiters may be 6-3 or 6-4 but many teams see him as big upside even though he is a little smaller than ideal. But if he “were”, 6-6 he would go 2nd in this draft.

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