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Details of owners’ latest offer emerge, just last offer tweaked

Nov 11, 2011, 8:01 AM EST

David Stern, Adam Silver AP

The real question is how the sides are going to handle it if — more likely when — the players reject the latest offer from David Stern and the owners.

We are starting to learn more about that offer, and basically it is minor changes from the offer the players rejected last weekend. It doesn’t sound like the players have any interest in accepting this one either, although if they think this is the best offer they are going to get it may change their minds.

Here is what we know.

• It calls for a 50/50 split of basketball related income. Technically it is the 49 percent to 51 percent band in place in the last owners offer. But the reality of how that band is structured is that the split is 50/50 with little variation.

• Teams paying the luxury tax would be able to use a “mini mid-level” of $3 million for three years (up from two years at $2.5), according to Ken Berger of CBSSports.

• There would be a sign-and-trade deal for teams paying the luxury tax, but it is restrictive (it was banned totally in the last league offer), Berger reports.

• There would be a salary floor for teams at 85 percent of the salary cap number, according to Chris Mannix of Sports Illustrated.

• The players would be able to opt out of the labor deal after six seasons, although it would be a 10-year deal.

Interestingly, the players are not going to get together and discuss this until Monday. That gives a full weekend for players and agents on both sides to try and rally support among the team representatives before the meeting. It gives time to Fisher to decide how he wants to sell the ideas to the reps.

What ultimately matters most is how both sides react when the players reject this offer next week. But now we’re starting to know what they are turning down.

  1. leearmon - Nov 11, 2011 at 8:20 AM

    Do you have any idea on the details / restrictions of teams going over the cap to re-sign their own players? I just wonder the syllogism behind making such strict rules for going over the cap. The Thunder in two seasons will have a big decision on their hands if these hard caps system rules are in place. The market will be great for Westbrook & Ibaka. If OKC wants to keep THEIR talent together they are going to have to pay the luxury tax. GM’s will fight over offering Westbrook a ridiculous contract. You can hear them now “A young PG who’s athletic, can rebound and score in bunches. We’ve got the next D-Rose”

    Instead they’ll make Westbrook the next Marbury. Forcing OKC to either max him out (which is the wrong idea) or not match an offer sheet. Same thing goes for Ibaka and Harden. The way i’ve interpreted the “hard cap rules” makes it next to impossible for OKC to keep their core 4 together.

    Please let us know if they addressed that. Because if they didnt it just shows you how off base the owners are. While the idea is to punish big spending teams to sign free agents, it looks like it hurts teams who do it the right way. I.e. building through the draft.

    • therealhtj - Nov 11, 2011 at 10:30 AM

      There was no was under the old system a tiny market like OKC was going to pay 2 max or near max guys and 3 other guys making 7mil +, so what made you think there was any chance they’d be able to pay them under a new, even more restrictive one? Bird rights seem like they’re still in place, but is OKC going to pay a more punitive luxury tax to keep all of them? Doubtful.

      This new CBA is about limiting spending and preventing another Miami scenario. It’s not about competitive balance. It’s about money, plain and simple. The competitive balance argument flew out the window when the owners backed away from the hard cap and non-guaranteed contracts.

      • leearmon - Nov 11, 2011 at 10:49 AM

        Uh last time I checked, the Spurs paid a lot of money to keep Duncan, Ginobili, and Parker. Since when did San Antonio become a large market? Need another example? When Lebron played in Cleveland I remember the Cavs spending close to $67 million in free agency for Larry Hughes then bringing in Ben Wallace who was greatly over paid in addition to the corpse of Wally Szcerbiak. Still not enough? Orlando in each of the last two seasons brought in two high priced players (Vince Carter & Gilbert Arenas) then traded for Hedo Turkoglu and his albatross contract in addition to Howard and Rashard Lewis

        . Since you have forgotten or failed to mention those above examples, Im going to assume you are not aware of the specifics of the NBA and contracts. Rookie wages, even after they become restricted free agents are still well below that of players who reach full free agency. Meaning whatever Westbrook gets, it will still be less than a contract of say Arenas, Carter, Ginobili etc. However, in the old CBA teams were not penalized as harshly for going over the cap. As I stated earlier, teams in all market sizes have gone over the cap. The Spurs represent the best example of a small market team going over the cap just to re-sign their own players. So to say “There was no was under the old system a tiny market lie OKC was going to pay 2 max or near max guys…” is just categorically false.

  2. greatminnesotasportsmind - Nov 11, 2011 at 9:58 AM

    Unbelieveable. If your going to walk away from a 50/50 split, I sure as hell hope the owners hold an even harder line and the best you get is 47/53. Stop being greedy and screwing the fans over.

  3. leearmon - Nov 11, 2011 at 10:56 AM

    Also, and im not sure PBT will even post this, as it seems they have a problem with me. But if the harshness of the new CBA and the work stoppage that has gone along with it, is because of the Miami Heat. People need to understand that MIAMI DID NOT WIN THE CHAMPIONSHIP. Were getting a little carried away with a team that finished second. Especially when you consider Lebron has shown his personal struggles in the clutch, and the guy who flourishes in crunch time (Dwyane Wade) will be 30 in 3 months and has seen his effectiveness steadily decrease in the last 3 years.

  4. leearmon - Nov 11, 2011 at 11:09 AM

    PBT didn’t post my response to the realhtj so I’m going to try this again. Originally posted at 10:49am

    Uh last time I checked, the Spurs paid a lot of money to keep Duncan, Ginobili, and Parker. Since when did San Antonio become a large market? Need another example? When Lebron played in Cleveland I remember the Cavs spending close to $67 million in free agency for Larry Hughes then bringing in Ben Wallace who was greatly over paid in addition to the corpse of Wally Szcerbiak. Still not enough? Orlando in each of the last two seasons brought in two high priced players (Vince Carter & Gilbert Arenas) then traded for Hedo Turkoglu and his albatross contract in addition to Howard and Rashard Lewis

    . Since you have forgotten or failed to mention those above examples, Im going to assume you are not aware of the specifics of the NBA and contracts. Rookie wages, even after they become restricted free agents are still well below that of players who reach full free agency. Meaning whatever Westbrook gets, it will still be less than a contract of say Arenas, Carter, Ginobili etc. However, in the old CBA teams were not penalized as harshly for going over the cap. As I stated earlier, teams in all market sizes have gone over the cap. The Spurs represent the best example of a small market team going over the cap just to re-sign their own players. So to say “There was no was under the old system a tiny market lie OKC was going to pay 2 max or near max guys…” is just categorically false.

  5. mytthor - Nov 11, 2011 at 1:15 PM

    Tell me if this idea is crazy; a team can sign any player they draft or acquire during a draft day trade to a max contract. Other than that they can only sign 1 player at a time to a max contract. There would have to be rules in place as far as what constitutes a “max contract” to prevent just signing a guy to a contract for 10 dollars less. But under a rule like that, a team can have 1 superstar, 2 or more if they are amazing in the draft. Movement is restricted, good organizations are rewarded.

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