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Report: Hardline NBA owners had conference call Monday

Nov 8, 2011, 8:08 AM EDT

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To the hardline NBA owners, Steve Blake is the enemy.

The NBA’s hardline owners spoke Monday on a conference call that did not include David Stern, according to Chris Broussard of ESPN. Since Stern was not on the call this was essentially some form of group therapy and reinforcement, but apparently it did take place.

This is what Broussard tweeted:

7-11 hardline owners expressed their displeasure with David Stern’s 50/50 offer to the players Monday on a conference call, sources said. The owners on the call included Michael Jordan, Paul Allen and Herb Kohl. They are hoping the players reject the offer, sources said…

The owners fear the player reps meeting in NYC Tuesday will push for approval of the deal. David Stern was not on the conference call.

Why do they hate Steve Blake? Because Blake is one of the players pushing for a vote on David Stern’s ultimatum. If it goes to a vote, it very well may pass (the union is divided).

But the other question I have is this: Are 7 to 11 owners driving this? At what point do the majority of owners tell them to sit down, shut up and take the 50/50 as a massive win? Because at some point the only way a deal gets done is if someone on both sides tells the hardliners to shut up.

It can’t happen soon enough.

  1. dumbasdirt - Nov 8, 2011 at 8:29 AM

    The hardline owners must be aware of the stats I listed below about the gross revenues, and average player salaries of the 4 major team sports.

    NFL: Total revenue about 8 Billion a year. Revenues divided among 53 players per team Average player salary (under the old CBA) 1.9 million a season. (Under the new CBA it might be less)

    MLB: Total revenue about 7 Billion a year. Revenues divided among 25 players per team. Average player salary about 3.3 Million a year.

    NHL: Total revenue about 3 Billion a year. Revenues divided among 23 players per team. Average player salary about 2.4 million a year

    NBA: Total revenue about 4 Billion a year. Revenues divided among 15 players per team. Average player salary about 5.15 Million a year

    So NBA players make more money per player on average in part because the money is divided among 15 players per team instead of 23, 25, or 53 players per team.

    Even if the players take the current 49-51% offer they will still be making more money per player even though the NBA takes in less total revenue than the NFL, or MLB.

    This may help explain the stance of the “Hardline” owners

    • jjstrokes - Nov 8, 2011 at 8:41 AM

      That’s the nature of this game my friend. I don’t see how the NBA hard-liner Owners can possibly resolve this issue. Are you suggesting the NBA allow teams to staff 23-25 players on each team & pay them close to MLB & NFL players?? hahaha, Basketball is a 5-on-5 game; far less players are involved bc that’s the rule of the sport. The only way to fix your so-called “problem” would be to change the rules of Basketball. How else can that be fixed???… Unless we had a league where the Owners make far more than any other league. It would be the like the VIP league for the top Billionaires. So what’s worse: Players (who have played the game their whole lives) or Billionaires profiting more of the game of basketball?

      • nicktomfrank - Nov 8, 2011 at 9:29 AM

        jjstrokes-seriously? I mean really? Come on man…..

        The way you resolve that issue is by giving the players less money to split. Not add more useless players to rosters to divide the cash up.

    • hail2tharedskins - Nov 8, 2011 at 9:15 AM

      Instead of simply looking at average salary per year, it is also useful to look at average salary per game played. I think that is a more useful stat considering that athelete are paid to perform and the revenues generated are generated from those games. I don’t what the numbers come out to be, but I do know on a per game basis NFL players are the highest paid as they should be.

    • hail2tharedskins - Nov 8, 2011 at 9:16 AM

      Instead of simply looking at average salary per year, it is also useful to look at average salary per game played. I think that is a more useful stat considering that athelete are paid to perform and the revenues generated are generated from those games. I don’t what the numbers come out to be, but I do know on a per game basis NFL players are the highest paid as they should be.

  2. hail2tharedskins - Nov 8, 2011 at 9:25 AM

    From article: But the other question I have is this: Are 7 to 11 owners driving this? At what point do the majority of owners tell them to sit down, shut up and take the 50/50 as a massive win?

    I think it is clear that the hardliners are not driving this or 50/50 offer never would have been made. However, considering that it takes 2/3rds of owners to rarify a new deal if is actually 11 hardliners, they do have the power to scuttle any deal. Realisiticly, you have a group of hardliners that want to reduce the players’ share of BRI to 47%, a group of owners that would give up even 52% just to get back on the court right away (because they have profitable franchises and/or title contending teams), and then you have the rest in the middle that want to reduce BRI as much as possible but also don’t want to miss games. The division is likely 1/3rd, 1/3rd, and 1/3rd (not exactly but close enough). The reason the hardliners want the players to reject the current proposal is that the longer this goes on and the more games that have already been sacraficed the owners in the middle are likely to move towards the hardliner’s position since there are longer games to protect. So, while the hardliners have not been driving this thing yet, if this drags on much longer they could become the majority in the owners group.

  3. stoutfiles - Nov 8, 2011 at 9:57 AM

    7-11 teams losing money is not good for the NBA. Another pro-player article from Kurt.

  4. jlinatl - Nov 8, 2011 at 2:17 PM

    I don’t agree with the hardline owners per se. But having a vocal group may be part of why the players could have a majority willing to accept the current deal. I just wonder if all of them are truly hardline or if some of them view sabre rattling as the best way to get the players to accept the current offer.

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