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A NBA labor deal is close, here’s what is still in the way

Oct 31, 2011, 8:08 AM EDT

Billy Hunter David Stern AP

Over the weekend, we told you that much of the framework of the NBA’s new Collective Bargaining Agreement is in place. Contract lengths, the luxury tax, and amnesty clause, a mid-level exception and a “stretch” exception are all basically in place. The New York Times called it the deal “95 percent” done. When asked Thursday, David Stern said he knows what the final deal will look like.

So why don’t we have a deal? Let’s finish this thing and play some hoops.

Because it’s like a football drive — you can cover 95 yards but the last five yards are the hardest to get. (Especially if Tony Romo is your quarterback.)

What still stands in the way? Here are the issues as broken down by the Times and Sports Illustrated.

• Basketball related income split. This is still the big one — how to divide up the NBA’s revenue. Officially the players have come down to 52.5 percent (down from the 57 percent they got in the old deal) while the owners are at 50 percent, up from their mythical 44 percent starting spot, a number they pulled out of thin air. The owners are holding firm and the players are not budging. Each percentage point is about $40 million last season, which means the divide for next season is $100 million and over the course of the contract more than $1 billion.

It’s the money that is key, fix the BRI split and the rest will be done fast.

• Player options in contracts. Last year LeBron James opted out of his deal with Cleveland and went to Miami. Orlando is worried that Dwight Howard is going to opt out of his deal. New Orleans is worried about Chris Paul opting out of his deal.

The league wants to do away with player options on contracts. The players like their players to have options. No deal on this yet.

• Salary annual increases. From Sam Amick at Sports Illustrated.

Previously, Bird (rights) players were given 10.5 percent annual raises while non-Bird players were given 8 percent raises. The NBPA has proposed annual increases of 7.5 percent and 6 percent, while the NBA is proposing annual increases of 5.5 percent and 3.5 percent.

The Bird exception is what a team can use to go over the salary cap to re-sign its own free agents.

• Sign and trade contracts. This is what LeBron James did to Cleveland, what Chris Bosh did to Toronto and one things owners have allowed to keep in the new CBA. However, the owners do not want teams over the luxury tax to be able do sign-and-trades. The players want the rich teams to be able to spend wildly.

They are not that far apart on these things. There is a deal there to be had.

Well, once they sit down and start talking again.

  1. mikey1977 - Nov 1, 2011 at 4:55 PM

    Hey NBA, if you require further proof that no one gives a sh**t about your league…just look at the number of posts (or lack thereof)

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