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Players, owners have good bargaining session Wednesday

Jun 2, 2011, 10:12 AM EDT

NBA & NBA Players Association Announce New CBA Getty Images

Through all the public pronouncements from both sides — the NBA owners asking for a hard cap, the players filings a grievance with the National Labor Relations Board — there has always been an undercurrent of optimism from some that a new NBA Collective Bargaining Agreement would get done to save all of next season.

Basically, the league is in too good a spot to let this opportunity slip by, and both sides know it. There are some hardline owners and some players with their heels dug in, and part of what has been going on so far is a show for them, but when talks get serious there are plenty who believe a deal will get done.

That was the vibe out of Wednesday’s talks in Miami (the two sides will meet again in Dallas next week). The Players Association made a new proposal last week that seems to have thawed the ice, reports Ken Berger of CBS Sports.

Second, the substance of what the players proposed – though closely guarded by the two sides – may have opened the door for a breakthrough in the talks. Only vague details of the players’ new proposed ideas have been revealed, but sources say their approach was designed as a two-pronged solution: 1) an alternative to a hard-cap system that would give the owners another path to reach their goals while maintaining some elements of the current soft-cap system; and 2) a revised split of basketball-related income that would do the same.

The second part of that is key — the basketball-related income (BRI number). In the end, that is the number that really matters. That is the percentage of the pie the owners get to keep.

Right now, the players get 57 percent of all BRI — the money from ticket sales, television deals national and local, and just about everything generated by the league. The owners want a bigger slice of that pie. The Players Association has always seemed willing to compromise on that, the question has always been how much and now much would the owners demand.

The players are also demanding more revenue sharing between the owners. Local television revenue factors into BRI, but while the Kings made just $11 million off their deal last year the Lakers just signed a deal that will pay them upwards of $150 million a season starting next year. That balance has to be worked out (but the big market owners are insistent that revenue shared be put back into the team not into smaller market owners pockets).

Both sides are working to find a compromise before the June 30 deadline — July 1 there will be a lockout. But the real pressure deadline to save all of training camp and the next season is more like the second half of September. Free agency and Summer League could be affected, but the entire season would be saved.

And there is reason to hope that both sides want to get this done.

  1. starks3 - Jun 2, 2011 at 11:04 AM

    This season has been too good for them to screw it up with a lockout

  2. redbear18 - Jun 3, 2011 at 12:04 AM

    Come on, everybody loves basketball! Don’t drag it out like the NFL, get it done ASAP!

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