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NBA Playoffs: Westbrook, Thunder implode in the fourth quarter

May 7, 2011, 8:15 PM EDT

O. J. Mayo, Kevin Durant

In Game 1 of the Western Conference semifinal matchup between the Thunder and the Grizzlies, Oklahoma City was powerless against Memphis’ big men. In the early parts of Game 3, it was the Thunder’s speed that made the difference, particularly the speed of Russell Westbrook. However, the Thunder ended up falling on their own sword late in the game, and are now facing a 2-1 deficit after a heartbreaking overtime loss.

After a breakout regular season, Westbrook has had an up-and-down playoffs, mixing brilliant performances with games where he strangled the Oklahoma City offense by dribbling the air out of the ball and forcing outside jump shots. On Saturday, Westbrook had a Jekyll-and-Hyde performance that served as a microcosm of just how dangerous Westbrook can be to both is opponents and his own team.

For the first three quarters, Westbrook was masterful. He didn’t have a particularly efficient scoring performance, but he set the pace of the game. He attacked the rim constantly, pushed the pace to keep the Grizzlies from setting up their half-court defense, and did a fantastic job of setting up his teammates. Westbrook finished with 12 assists, and seven of Kevin Durant‘s field goals were set up by a Westbrook assist.

When the Thunder played the Lakers in last year’s playoffs, Durant struggled to find space against Ron Artest in isolation situations, and only shot 35% for the series. With Westbrook commanding the defense’s attention and allowing Durant to either catch and shoot or roll to the rim for a dunk, Durant has been exponentially more effective. When Westbrook balances efficiency with aggression, the Thunder are a completely different kind of offensive animal than they were in last year’s playoffs.

In the fourth quarter, however, the bad Westbrook showed up, and the Thunder offense went completely stagnant. The team only scored two points between the 7:43 mark of the fourth quarter and the 0:52 mark of the game, and the Grizzlies were able to tie the game by outscoring the Thunder 15-4 during that stretch. Although the entire Thunder team deserves a share of the blame for Oklahoma City’s miserable offensive display, Westbrook was the primary culprit for the Thunder’s offensive struggles — he dribbled the ball aimlessly, didn’t look to make aggressive moves to the rim, was far too eager to settle for jump shots, and made little effort to get his teammates involved. When Durant did get the ball, he usually got the ball 25 feet away from the basket with the shot clock running down and a defender in his face, and not even Durant is able to turn those situations into high-percentage opportunities.

While the Thunder imploded offensively, the Grizzlies were slowly but surely able to claw their way into the game, and the game went into overtime with the score tied at 86.

In overtime, the Grizzlies continued to attack the basket aggressively; the Grizzlies scored 80 points from the paint and the free throw line on Saturday, and all of their overtime points came at the rim or the free throw line. Meanwhile, the Thunder continued to look confused — a beautiful James Harden feed to set up Nick Collison for a dunk only served as a reminder of just how broken the Thunder’s late-game offense was. When it was all over, the Thunder had been outscored by 20 points over the last 17 minutes of play, and they now find themselves in a 2-1 series deficit.

This was a horrible loss for the Thunder, and it could easily have been the difference between a conference finals berth and an early playoff exit. The Thunder did everything right. Westbrook and Durant were working well together, the offense was rolling, and Perkins and Co. were actually winning the battle in the trenches against Memphis’ twin towers, holding them to 12-36 shooting from the field . They were doing absolutely everything they needed to do to beat the Grizzlies and regain home-court advantage.

Then they imploded, and they now have to face the fact that they beat themselves in a game they needed to win. Winning four out of seven games against the Grizzlies is no easy task; in order to advance after this performance, the Thunder will essentially have to beat Memphis five times in seven games.

If the Thunder play the way they did in the first three quarters for a full 48 minutes, they can absolutely tie up the series before it comes back to Oklahoma City. But on Saturday, the Thunder’s inexperience was their undoing, and they may not be ready to contend for a championship until Westbrook and company can stop putting on these types of performances.

  1. borderline1988 - May 8, 2011 at 12:18 AM

    Lost in all of this…
    How good (and surprisingly good) has Mike Conley been in these playoffs? He’s proven himself to be a legitimate starting PG on a good playoff team. How many so called basketball experts saw that coming 2 years ago?
    I’d like to see a PBT post on Conley. He deserves it more than anyone else right now.

    • passerby23 - May 8, 2011 at 10:32 AM

      Who also saw Marc Gasol outplaying his brother in these playoffs and his team potentially going farther than the Lakers? There don’t seem to be any questions as to whether Marc Gasol will show up. I don’t think anyone predicted that.

  2. mikebailey4052 - May 8, 2011 at 3:08 AM

    Suck that Clay Bennett

  3. r0llinginthedeep - May 8, 2011 at 4:42 AM

    I tell you what, if Tony Allen doesn’t get 1st Team All-Defense this year, it will be an absolute crime. He was crazy good last night (aswell as being his usual crazy) just like he has been all year.

  4. budrow - May 8, 2011 at 5:32 AM

    Remember the media uproar when Memphis gave Conley that contract at the beginning of the season? How’s that crow taste! Marc Gasol needs to be in Miami next year. The dude is monster with skills that pay the bills

  5. cfmdev60 - May 8, 2011 at 9:10 AM

    I don’t understand Russell Westbrook…brilliant for 3 quarters and then hogged the ball so much in the fourth that I was screaming at the tv for him to pass. He was dribbling until the shot clock was down to 6 or 7 seconds. And you got to hand it to Tony Allen…he was dogging KD so much that he couldn’t get any separation when he did get the ball….geez…this was a disappointing loss for the Thunder for sure…

  6. LPad - May 8, 2011 at 1:04 PM

    Part of the reason why he’s dribbling the ball at the top of the key is because their running KD and Harden off of baseline screens and they aren’t getting open. Then the shot clock goes down and then either Westbrook has to create a shot or KD comes and gets the ball and create a shot. OKC’s offense is bogging down, but blaming it all on Westbrook means that you are ignoring the offball action that is a major part of their offense.

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