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Tyler cuts phase one of the 'amateur pro' experiment short

Mar 19, 2010, 12:25 PM EDT

Jeremy Tyler made history this season when he left his high school as a highly-touted senior prospect to play professionally in Europe. Now, he’s made history again by setting the record for the longest trip of shame back to the United States with his tail between his legs. Tyler has called it quits on playing in Israel, and won’t even complete the season with Maccabi Haifa.

I, for one, am shocked. You mean to tell me that a high school senior can’t compete on a professional level with grown men? Especially one accustomed to dominating high school opponents with his 6’11” frame and credible athleticism? No. Way.

Well, way. Tyler’s homeward bound, and his attempt to take the Brandon Jennings revolution one step further culminated in some unspectacular play against professional-level competition and plenty of frustration. I’m not sure what exactly Tyler expected; even weaker teams overseas are still filled with pro players, most of which trump Tyler in their experience as well as their ability to produce. The learning curve in any such situation is going to be awfully steep.

The question for Tyler should never have been which path would help him best prepare for NBA basketball. Rather, out of the options available, which most made sense for a player of Tyler’s physical, mental, and emotional maturity level. It’s not easy to go from the top prospect of your high school class to sitting three games on the bench without even suiting up. I can only imagine that this experience was an incredibly humbling one.

Now, less than a year after making his decision to forgo his senior season, it’s painfully obvious that Tyler and his family made the wrong choice. I’m sure that the high school competition wasn’t up to snuff, and all of the credit in the world goes to Jeremy for making the tough choice. This really could have worked out for him in the long run, but it wasn’t in the cards. The only trouble for him now is deciding where to go next.

His options are essentially limited to two: look for an opportunity to play elsewhere overseas or play domestically in the D-League. Playing for a pro team in Europe could really help Tyler’s development, but he’d face more of the same problems. I don’t see how the system would be significantly different than the one he’s once failed in, and that’s troubling. A jump back to the D-League would give Tyler another opportunity to play trailblazer, and would put him back in a comfort zone by playing and living in America again.

That may not be the best thing in turning him from a boy to a man, but it could be essential in grooming the skills of an elite basketball prospect while minimizing distractions.  

  1. Glenn - Mar 20, 2010 at 1:01 AM

    This is a perfect example of why the pro system is all screwed up. There should be a law implemented that prohibits professional sports from allowing anyone that has not completed 4 years at the collegiate level to enter into the professional realm of sports. I know, I will get clobbered with emails to the contrary. This is just my opinion. I am sure others will differ but tha’t ok.

  2. NCSailor - Mar 20, 2010 at 6:15 AM

    What is the problem? Your boy Jeremy is a quitter. This character trait was identified early and has saved everyone money and time. This proves the system works. Everyone wants the bazillion dollar glam job, only a handful will do the work required. QUITTERS never do the work, THEY QUIT!!!

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