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Nets don't want your sympathy

Mar 14, 2010, 4:31 PM EDT

Rob Peterson at FanHouse has been following the worst team in the league as they seek to avoid being the worst team in history. Today he checks in with a piece on the general attitude of the Nets. The summary? The Nets don’t want you to pity them. Empathize, understand, but they are not feeling sorry for themselves.

The story also does a great job of showcasing how the Nets are keeping things in perspective. I often hear fans making jokes about the Nets, as if they really were the worst team in NBA history. But if you watch the games really watch them, you know that’s not true. They’re still out there competing, often making long runs in the second half of games. They’ll play with fire and intensity and crispness… and then it all falls apart. Terrible teams? Truly terrible teams? Look outmatched in 10 of 12 quarters.

They also feature real talent. Their best players are not marginal role players on contending squads. Devin Harris is feeling like himself finally, and Brook Lopez impresses anyone who watches him. With multiple draft picks, the Nets have a bright future, but they also have a foundation of players to build upon.

It’s hard to argue against the win-loss record, but if you’ve tracked them, from the nail-biters against Miami and others to the games where they’ve let leads slip because of inexperience, you’ll know that they aren’t deserving of your pity, and eventually there will be brighter times for this franchise, even if they are in Brooklyn.

  1. geo - Mar 14, 2010 at 10:00 PM

    If the Nets kept lawrence Frank they would probably have 15 wins.

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